Pit and fissure sealant application updating the technique

Isolation of the tooth and access to the pits and fissures contribute to sealant success.

Teeth should therefore be more fully erupted into the oral cavity before attempting the placement of a resin sealant.

This article focuses on resin-based sealants because most of the research data supports their clinical use.

The published literature has indicated that clinical retention of resin-based sealants is superior to that of glass ionomer-based sealants.

While there are certain differences in the properties of the cured resins and in clinical technique when using these two classes of material, both self-cure and light-cure sealants appear to provide equivalent clinical effectiveness when applied to etched dry enamel.

Both self-cure and light-cure sealants appear to provide equivalent clinical effectiveness when applied to etched dry enamel.

Over the past 30 years, significant progress has been made in the prevention of dental caries in children and adolescents.

One 4-year study showed an overall 43% decrease in the prevalence of caries effectiveness with a significantly better sealant retention on premolars (84%) than molars (30%).

Sealant loss was 20% while there was a 55% reduction in caries rate for the sealed teeth versus the unsealed teeth.

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